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Examines the extent to which gender influences the political policy views and attitudes of women

Table of contents

List of Figures
List of Tables
Acknowledgments
Chapter 1: Gender in U.S. Politics
Chapter 2: Women, Minorities, the LBGTQ Community, and the American Dream
Chapter 3: Marriage and U.S. Politics
Chapter 4: Ties that Bind: Feminists v. Women’s Group Fate in U.S. Politics
Chapter 5: Black Women Identities and Intersectionality Theory for U.S. Blacks
Chapter 6: Stereotypes about Black Women and Policy Views
Chapter 7: Stereotypes, Sexual Minorities and Community Acceptance
Chapter 8: Gendered Pluralism

Description

Focused on structural and political intersectionalities, Gendered Pluralism takes a broader approach to understanding the constellation of factors that drive gender and racial differences on an array of public policy issues. Belinda Robnett and Katherine Tate examine a broader set of actors absent the contextual factors that may drive them to compromise their opinions. Their study examines the ways in which (1) men and women differ on public policy issues and the factors that drive these differences; (2) whites and racial-ethnic minorities differ on public policy issues and the factors that drive these differences; (3) women differ on public policy issues and the factors that drive these differences; (4) African-American men and women differ on public policy issues and the factors that drive these differences; and (5) African-American women differ on public policy issues and the factors that drive these differences.

Belinda Robnett is former Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Professor Emeritus in the Department of Sociology at UC Santa Barbara.
Katherine Tate is Professor of Political Science at Brown University.

“Masterfully combining insights across Sociology and Political Science, Robnett and Tate’s theory of gendered pluralism pushes us beyond either/or thinking, revealing the complex intersections of gender with race, class, sexuality, and family in U.S. public opinion. This study will inspire a fresh look at the fields of both gender and pluralism for a new generation of scholars.”
—Catherine Bolzendahl, Oregon State University

- Catherine Bolzendahl

"[T]heir analyses and data are sure to inspire additional scholarship on when and why gender matters to Black and non-Black Americans. . . . Recommended."
Choice

- M. R. Michelson